Q: What are Hi-Oleic peanuts?

on Friday, 19 July 2013. Posted in Fats and Oils
Tagged: fats, nut, oleicacid, peanut allergy, peanuts

Q: What are Hi-Oleic peanuts?

A.

Hi Oleic Peanuts are peanuts that contain a higher amount of oleic acid compared to standard peanuts.

Q. Are fish oil capsules safe if I'm allergic to fish? If not, how do I get omega-3s?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Friday, 19 July 2013. Posted in Medical Diets
Tagged: allergies, fish oils, healthy eating, healthy heart, heart health, oils, omega-3, supplements

Q. Are fish oil capsules safe if I'm allergic to fish? If not, how do I get omega-3s?

THE QUESTION IN FULL

Q. I avoid seafood as I have an allergy to fish. So how would I increase my intake of omega-3 fats? Are fish oil capsules safe for me?

Q: What is Hi-oleic sunflower oil?

on Thursday, 18 July 2013. Posted in Fats and Oils
Tagged: fat, hi-oleic, oil, oleicacid, saturatedfat, sunfloweroil

Q: What is Hi-oleic sunflower oil?

A. You pronounce it high oh-lay-ick. Hi-oleic sunflower oil is a type of sunflower oil bred to have a high concentration of the fatty acid oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid which is in rich supply in olive oil and macadamia nuts.

EatKit Archive: DAIRY FOR BONE HEALTH

on Wednesday, 17 July 2013. Posted in Handy stuff

EatKit Archive: DAIRY FOR BONE HEALTH

Dairy foods such as milk, cheese and yogurt are the biggest contributor of bone-building calcium in our diets. The minimum recommended dairy serves have recently increased (from 3 to 4 serves a day), yet research shows that 8 out of 10 Australian adults failed to reach the previous target of three serves of dairy a day.

The July issue of the Foodwatch Newsletter is out now!

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Tuesday, 16 July 2013. Posted in Handy stuff
Tagged: ancient grains, Dry July, eatKit, Low GI Rice, newsletter, oats

The July issue of the Foodwatch Newsletter is out now!

In this issue of The Foodwatch Newsletter we look at the role of oats in our diets and why they are one of my Top 20 “Super Foods”. We also take a look at Dry July and Stress Down Day – two worthwhile initiatives aimed at helping Australians live a balanced, healthy life – emotionally and physically. As always we love to get your feedback on anything you’ve read in the newsletter or anything you’d like to see covered. 

Q. Which foods should someone with coeliac disease avoid?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 15 July 2013. Posted in Medical Diets
Tagged: balanced diet, breakfast cereals, carbohydrates, food labels, food safety, gluten, gluten-free, grains, healthy eating, healthy lifestyle, low GI, meal planning, nutrients, nutrition, special diets

Q. I have recently been diagnosed with coeliac disease. Could you tell me which specific foods to avoid?

A. Coeliac disease (pronounced seel-ee-ack) is the result of a permanent intolerance to gluten. If left untreated, it damages the delicate inner lining of the bowel preventing food from being digested and absorbed properly. Symptoms most often reported have been related to an ‘irritable bowel' - bloating and tummy pain, diarrhoea, weight loss and even vomiting.

 

5 easy swaps to make your kitchen heart-friendly

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Tuesday, 09 July 2013. Posted in Medical Diets
Tagged: cholesterol, cholesterol lowering, fibre, healthy heart, heart health, high cholesterol

5 easy swaps to make your kitchen heart-friendly

Troubled by high cholesterol? Or has your doctor said you need to get your cholesterol down? Before you start on medication, try my five easy swaps that will work painlessly with your body’s metabolism to get things lower. It’s not just a matter of buying skim milk and margarine. There are a whole range of foods that can actively help drive cholesterol down. Some block its absorption into the body, others help speed its exit so the end result is your blood levels drop.

clipboard  This post is sponsored by HeartActive milk  

Product Review: Menu Planner App

on Friday, 05 July 2013. Posted in Reviews

Product Review: Menu Planner App

Guest review by Michele Pink, Accredited Practising Dietitian at Good Health Nutrition and Dietetics

I am a big believer in menu planning for a number of different reasons; it saves money, makes healthy eating easier, decreases stress levels, saves time, encourages variety in eating and allows you to take into account life's busy times. So when the opportunity arose to investigate a new menu planner App, called 'Menu Planner', I jumped at the chance.