Q. How often should my teenage kids eat fast food?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Thursday, 12 September 2013. Posted in Family and kids
Tagged: dinners, eating out, family fare, fast food, fat, McDonalds, super foods

Q. How often should my teenage kids eat fast food?

A. No more than twice a week, according to a recent US study. The CARDIA study, the first over the long-term to investigate the link between fast-food consumption and ill health, showed that the more fast food consumed the greater a person's health risk.

Q. What's the difference between Diet Coke and Coke Zero?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Thursday, 12 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: caffeine, calories, dieting, diets, drink, drinks

Q. What's the difference between Diet Coke and Coke Zero?

A. At first glance, Diet Coke and Coke Zero appear to be identical. Both contain no kilojoules (calories) and no sugar. Both are artificially sweetened with (the same amount) of aspartame and acesulfame K and therefore have the same ‘sweetness’.

 

Additives most likely to cause adverse reactions

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Thursday, 12 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, colours, flavours, food colours, food labels, msg, preservatives

Additives most likely to cause adverse reactions

The consumption of additives in food is a vexed issue. On the one hand, no-one plans to consume them in the first place and some – a limited number – have been linked to health problems ranging from asthma, wheezing, rashes, digestive upsets, behaviour problems in kids resulting in overactivity, lack of concentration and impulsiveness (hyperactivity).

Q. Why do food companies have to use additives? And how many are there?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 09 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, colours, emulsifier, emulsifiers, food labels, labelling, labels, preservatives

Q.  Why do food companies have to use additives?  And how many are there?

A.  Additives are used to extend shelf life or make a food more convenient or attractive or to be lower in kilojoules/calories.  There are around 300 additives permitted for use in Australia and you can group them into around 20 different categories based on what function they perform.

Q. What is rooibos and is it really free of caffeine?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Friday, 06 September 2013. Posted in Healthy eating
Tagged: antioxidants, caffeine, calories, drink, drinks, fluids, hydration, tea, water

Q. What is rooibos and is it really free of caffeine?

A. Rooibos or Red Tea is a herbal infusion made from the leaves and stems of a leguminous shrub (Aspalathus linearis) that is native to South Africa. It's made in the same way as normal tea and is most commonly seen as red rooibus although there is a green rooibos. It has needle-like leaves that produce a hot drink with an attractive flavour and light red-brown colour.

Product review: Up&Go Liquid Breakfast

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Tuesday, 03 September 2013. Posted in Reviews
Tagged: breakfast, breakfast cereals, calories, dairy, drinks, Liquid breakfast, liquid diet, school lunch, sugar, sugary drinks

Product review:  Up&Go Liquid Breakfast

When it launched Up&Go 15 years ago in Australia, Sanitarium created a whole new category in breakfasts. Today it still holds 99 per cent of the liquid breakfast market and has fuelled early morning starts for young and old.

According to Australian Food News, in 2012 alone, Sanitarium sold over 34 million litres through supermarkets so it's clearly a marketing success and appeals to that morning rush hour when kids have to be fed and sent off the school, parents are busy packing lunches and driving to training or music along with getting ready for their own day.

Q. What does EMULSIFIER mean on the label?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Tuesday, 03 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, emulsifier, emulsifiers, fat, food labels, FSANZ, salad

Q. What does EMULSIFIER mean on the label?

A. Emulsifiers are substances which stabilise mixtures and prevent oil and water from separating. In a salad dressing, for instance, an emulsifier keeps the oil and vinegar mixed so they don't separate into two layers on standing.

A day’s eating plan to lower your man’s cholesterol

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Tuesday, 27 August 2013. Posted in Medical Diets
Tagged: balanced diet, calcium, cholesterol, cholesterol lowering, dairy, eating plan, healthy eating, healthy heart, healthy snacks, heart health, high cholesterol, milk

A day’s eating plan to lower your man’s cholesterol

With Father's Day, I thought it's appropriate to dedicate a post to men's nutrition. According to a recent newspaper article in the Good Food supplement of the Sydney Morning Herald, men like to eat steak, roasts, anything with chips, barbecued anything, curried anything and, of course, meat pies and sausages. But just because men like to eat it, it doesn't mean they should.