Q. Do herbs give you much in the way of nutrition?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 17 March 2014. Posted in Healthy eating
Tagged: antioxidants, flavours, fresh food, fresh foods, healthy cooking, healthyeating, herbs, polyphenols

Q. Do herbs give you much in the way of nutrition?

THE QUESTION IN DETAIL

Q. We eat so many herbs and spices in sauces and other such dishes. Despite the fact that we eat them in small amounts, are there any nutritional benefits from eating them? So is coriander good for you? Rosemary? Nutmeg?

Q. Is red wine actually good for you?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Friday, 14 March 2014. Posted in Healthy eating
Tagged: alcohol, antioxidants, healthyeating, polyphenols, redwine, wine

Q.  Is red wine actually good for you?

A. All alcohol, including red wine, has risks and benefits.

In small quantities - which means one glass a day for women - red wine is beneficial for your heart, thanks to its high level of grape antioxidants known as polyphenols. The French Paradox has proven that red wine is a 'heart protector' even when your diet is high in saturated fat from cheese, pate and pastries.

Q. Are there any hangover cures that actually work?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 10 March 2014. Posted in Medical Diets
Tagged: alcohol, alcoholic drinks, dehydration, drinks, hangover, headache, vomiting

Q. Are there any hangover cures that actually work?

A. Everyone has their own hangover remedy but there is little research to show that any actually work. However any help that minimises the pounding head, nausea or vomiting the morning after is always welcome!

Q. Is carob better for you than chocolate?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Friday, 07 March 2014. Posted in Healthy eating
Tagged: caffeine, carob, chocolate, cravings, fat, heathyeating, sugar

Q.  Is carob better for you than chocolate?

A. In truth, there's not much between them. It all depends on how you consume them. First I'd like to contrast carob with cocoa powder ...

Q. Is it true that the acidophilus in yoghurt is so unstable that it can be destroyed on the short unrefrigerated trip home from the supermarket?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Wednesday, 05 March 2014. Posted in Healthy eating
Tagged: foodstorage, healthyeating, superfoods, yoghurt

Q. Is it true that the acidophilus in yoghurt is so unstable that it can be destroyed on the short unrefrigerated trip home from the supermarket?

A. No. According to a major yoghurt manufacturer, you would have to leave the yoghurt in your car for 24 hours at a temperature of 100°F or 37°C or higher to kill the 'friendly bacteria'. The average trip home of 15 or 20 minutes would not do that. Still high temperatures may cause the total number of bacteria to decline.

Honey - is it healthier than sugar?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 03 March 2014. Posted in Carbs, sugars & fibres
Tagged: antioxidants, carbohydrates, carbs, fibre, GI, glycemic index, honey, sugar, sugar substitutes, sweet treats, sweeteners

Honey - is it healthier than sugar?

An amber fluid made by honey bees (Apis mellifera) from the nectar of flowers, honey has been ‘nature’s sweetener’ for centuries and is frequently marketed as ‘superior’ to sugar. Today we consume over 40 times more sugar than honey yet it remains a favourite flavouring in foods like honey cakes, sauces, breakfast cereals, honey-coated nuts, yoghurts and hams.  Here’s how it stacks up side by side with sugar.

Q. Could you explain how green long-life bags work?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Friday, 28 February 2014. Posted in Healthy eating
Tagged: convenience, fresh, fresh food, fresh foods, fresh markets, fresh vs frozen, freshfruit, fruit, healthy eating, storagelife, vegetables, vegetarian

Q. Could you explain how green long-life bags work?

THE QUESTION IN FULL

Q. Could you explain how green long life bags or pods work? And do fruit and vegetables kept in them really have the same nutritional properties as fresh-fresh?

Q. What do the “May contain traces” statements mean on food and can my allergic child have them?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Wednesday, 26 February 2014. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, allergies, allergy, labelling, labels, nuts

Q. What do the “May contain traces” statements mean on food and can my allergic child have them?

A. The statement 'May contain traces of ..." is put onto food labels when manufacturers believe that the food is at risk of contamination from a problem ingredient such as peanuts or fish (called an allergen). This usually arises when nut-free biscuits, say, are baked on the same line as biscuits that have peanuts. Despite their best efforts to clean the production line, you can never rule out the chance that a small piece of peanut from one batch may accidentally get into another batch or dough.