Additives & labels

The Worst 30 Foods for you to eat (beware)

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Wednesday, 08 October 2014. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: Healthy Star Rating, high fat, high salt, high sugar, junk food, sodium, Worst 30 foods

The Worst 30 Foods for you to eat (beware)

Using the new Health Star Rating I’ve calculated the numbers of stars that the worst 30 foods will get. However, you’re unlikely to ever see any star ratings on them because it’s a voluntary code. Think chocolate bars, pods, lollies, cheesy salty snacks in a packet, choc cookies and soft drinks. Yes there are many more –and I’d love to hear your requests – but here we did the calculations for you on the ones that sprang to mind.

 

The Health Star Rating – what is it and what does it mean for you?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 18 August 2014. Posted in Additives & labels

The Health Star Rating – what is it and what does it mean for you?

The Health Star Rating (HSR) system ranks food products on a scale from half to five stars on the front of food packs. Like the energy rating you spot on fridges and washing machines, the more stars the better. Foods with five stars being the best nutritional choice.

It’s meant to help us decide whether or not to buy a packaged food product like a bar, cereal, bread or meal base, but how useful is it really?

Q. How come many of the cans in my cupboard have no use-by dates on them?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Friday, 02 May 2014. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: Best Before Date, canned food, food safety, food storage, healthy eating, Use-By Date

Q. How come many of the cans in my cupboard have no use-by dates on them?

THE QUESTION IN FULL

Q. I checked my kitchen cupboard and couldn't find Use-by dates on half of my canned foods. Even on a can of spaghetti sauce, which contains meat, there was no Use-by date. How come?

Q. Are waxed apples harmful to eat?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Friday, 04 April 2014. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, fresh, fresh foods, fresh markets, freshfruit, wellness

Q. Are waxed apples harmful to eat?

Q.  Can you tell me if the wax on the skin of apples is bad for me?

Q. What do the “May contain traces” statements mean on food and can my allergic child have them?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Wednesday, 26 February 2014. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, allergies, allergy, labelling, labels, nuts

Q. What do the “May contain traces” statements mean on food and can my allergic child have them?

A. The statement 'May contain traces of ..." is put onto food labels when manufacturers believe that the food is at risk of contamination from a problem ingredient such as peanuts or fish (called an allergen). This usually arises when nut-free biscuits, say, are baked on the same line as biscuits that have peanuts. Despite their best efforts to clean the production line, you can never rule out the chance that a small piece of peanut from one batch may accidentally get into another batch or dough.

Q. What do 'no preservatives, no artificial colours and no artificial flavours' really mean?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 30 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, allergies, childhood allergies, food colours, food labels, food safety, fresh foods, FSANZ

[THE QUESTION IN FULL]

Q. Why do some products state 'no preservatives, no artificial colours and no artificial flavours' but the list of ingredients then lists flavour enhancers (621, 627, 631) flavours (270, 262) and colours (160a)?

Q. What level of sodium should I look for on a food label?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Tuesday, 24 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: health, healthy eating, healthy lifestyle, heart health, junk food, nutrition, salt, snacks, sodium

Q. What level of sodium should I look for on a food label?

[THE QUESTION IN FULL]

Q. When comparing the label of a food, I am unsure what level of sodium is acceptable for a healthy diet. Please help!

Q. What does the term MILK SOLIDS mean on a food label?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 16 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, allergies, calcium, childhood allergies, dairy, food labels, food safety, milk, yoghurt

Q.  What does the term MILK SOLIDS mean on a food label?

A.   ‘Milk solids’ refers to the dried powder left after all the water is removed from liquid milk. It is similar to the milk powder you buy at the supermarket and can be full-fat or non-fat (skim).