Additives & labels

Q. How come many of the cans in my cupboard have no use-by dates on them?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Friday, 02 May 2014. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: Best Before Date, canned food, food safety, food storage, healthy eating, Use-By Date

Q. How come many of the cans in my cupboard have no use-by dates on them?

THE QUESTION IN FULL

Q. I checked my kitchen cupboard and couldn't find Use-by dates on half of my canned foods. Even on a can of spaghetti sauce, which contains meat, there was no Use-by date. How come?

Q. Are waxed apples harmful to eat?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Friday, 04 April 2014. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, fresh, fresh foods, fresh markets, freshfruit, wellness

Q. Are waxed apples harmful to eat?

Q.  Can you tell me if the wax on the skin of apples is bad for me?

Q. What do the “May contain traces” statements mean on food and can my allergic child have them?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Wednesday, 26 February 2014. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, allergies, allergy, labelling, labels, nuts

Q. What do the “May contain traces” statements mean on food and can my allergic child have them?

A. The statement 'May contain traces of ..." is put onto food labels when manufacturers believe that the food is at risk of contamination from a problem ingredient such as peanuts or fish (called an allergen). This usually arises when nut-free biscuits, say, are baked on the same line as biscuits that have peanuts. Despite their best efforts to clean the production line, you can never rule out the chance that a small piece of peanut from one batch may accidentally get into another batch or dough.

Q. What do 'no preservatives, no artificial colours and no artificial flavours' really mean?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 30 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, allergies, childhood allergies, food colours, food labels, food safety, fresh foods, FSANZ

[THE QUESTION IN FULL]

Q. Why do some products state 'no preservatives, no artificial colours and no artificial flavours' but the list of ingredients then lists flavour enhancers (621, 627, 631) flavours (270, 262) and colours (160a)?

Q. What level of sodium should I look for on a food label?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Tuesday, 24 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: health, healthy eating, healthy lifestyle, heart health, junk food, nutrition, salt, snacks, sodium

Q. What level of sodium should I look for on a food label?

[THE QUESTION IN FULL]

Q. When comparing the label of a food, I am unsure what level of sodium is acceptable for a healthy diet. Please help!

Q. What does the term MILK SOLIDS mean on a food label?

Written by Catherine Saxelby on Monday, 16 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: additives, allergies, calcium, childhood allergies, dairy, food labels, food safety, milk, yoghurt

Q.  What does the term MILK SOLIDS mean on a food label?

A.   ‘Milk solids’ refers to the dried powder left after all the water is removed from liquid milk. It is similar to the milk powder you buy at the supermarket and can be full-fat or non-fat (skim).

Q. What's the difference between Diet Coke and Coke Zero?

on Thursday, 12 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: caffeine, calories, dieting, diets, drink, drinks

Q. What's the difference between Diet Coke and Coke Zero?

A. At first glance, Diet Coke and Coke Zero appear to be identical. Both contain no kilojoules (calories) and no sugar. Both are artificially sweetened with (the same amount) of aspartame and acesulfame K and therefore have the same ‘sweetness’.

Q: What is permeate and how is it made?

on Thursday, 12 September 2013. Posted in Additives & labels
Tagged: calcium, dairy, lactose, milk, permeate

Q: What is permeate and how is it made?

A. It's easier to deal with the second part of this question first.

Permeate is made when whole milk is filtered through a fine 'sieve' or membrane using a technique called ultra-filtration. This filtering separates the lactose (also called milk sugar), the vitamins and the minerals from the milk protein and fat.